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Photography: Shooting & Processing Panoramas

Rich Harrington

About this course

When one photo doesn't do justice to a scene, take several—and then stitch them together them into a panorama. In this course, Richard Harrington details every step in the panoramic photography process, from shooting to post-processing.



The course begins with a look at the concepts and technical details for getting great shots: how to choose a shooting format and size, how to properly mount the camera on a tripod, how to overlap each shot, which lenses deliver best results, and more. Plus, learn about optional hardware like the GigaPan system and sliders, and a variety of mobile apps for capturing 360-degree panoramas with an iPhone. After shooting a variety of panoramas, Richard processes them using various software tools, from Lightroom to Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. The course concludes with advice on refining stitched panoramas and on saving them for a variety of destinations, from print to the web.


Topics include:

  • Choosing your gear
  • Compensating for the nodal point
  • Stitching in camera
  • Leveling the camera platform
  • Locking exposure and focus
  • Shooting with the GigaPan system
  • Shooting HDR panoramas
  • Shooting with an iPhone
  • Managing data from a panorama shoot
  • Reducing noise and removing dust with Camera Raw
  • Initiating the Photomerge command
  • Blending the photos
  • Refining highlights and shadows
  • Saving panoramas for print and the web

Curriculum

  • Exercise Files
  • Welcome
  • What you Should Know Before Watching this Course
  • Using the Exercise Files
  • What is Panoramic Photography?
  • Preview
    The End Product
  • The Objectives to Achieve
  • Technical Essentials
  • Determining a Target Delivery Size
  • What is a Field of View?
  • Preview
    What is the Nodal Point?
  • Post-Processing Choices for Panoramic Photography
  • Equipment: What You'll Need, What You Might Want
  • A Solid Tripod for Panoramic Photography
  • Choosing a Tripod Head
  • Lens Choices for Panoramic Photography
  • Compensating for the Nodal Point
  • Choosing a Shooting Format
  • Shooting Panoramas as JPEG Files
  • Shooting Panoramas as RAW Files
  • Stitching in Camera
  • Shooting Strategies for Panoramic Photography
  • Leveling the Camera Platform
  • Cleaning the Lens
  • Locking Exposure & Focus
  • Preview
    Shooting with Overlap
  • Minimizing Camera Shake
  • A Refresher on Exposure Triangle
  • Shooting with the Gigapan System
  • What is GigaPan?
  • Building the GigaPan Platform
  • Framing & Recording the Shot with the GigaPan System
  • Shooting HDR Panoramas
  • Why Shoot an HDR Panorama?
  • Setting Up for the Shot
  • Shooting the Source Images
  • Alternative Shooting Styles for Panoramic Photography
  • Shooting a 360 Degree Panorama
  • Shooting Handheld
  • Shooting Panoramas using an iPhone
  • Using Photosynth for Panoramic Photography
  • Using Occipital 360 for Panoramic Photography
  • Managing Data from a Panoramic Photography Shoot
  • Using a Card Wallet
  • Transferring Data
  • Choosing a Working Drive
  • Organizing the Images for Post
  • Preview
    Using Stacks in Adobe Bridge
  • Renaming & Renumbering Image Sequences
  • Developing Panoramic Photographs with Adobe Camera Raw
  • Basic Exposure with Camera RAW
  • Advanced Recovery with Camera RAW
  • Reducing Noise with Camera RAW
  • Removing Dust with Camera RAW
  • Choosing a Bit Depth
  • Compensating for Lens Distortion
  • Assembling Panoramas with Adobe Photoshop
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Bridge
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Photoshop
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Lightroom
  • Choosing an Alignment Method
  • Compensating for Lens Distortion
  • Blending the Photos
  • Post-Merge Cleanup
  • Using the Adaptive Wide Angle Filter to Remove Distortion
  • Merging the 360-degree Panoramic Photo
  • Merging the HDR Panoramic Photo
  • Merging the GigaPan Panoramic Photo
  • Using Photoshop Filters & Adjustment Layers to Enhance Panoramas
  • Using Third-Party Filters to Enhance Panoramas
  • Additional Third-Party Filters to Enhance Panoramas
  • Finalizing Panoramas
  • Using the Photo Filter Adjustment Layer
  • Refining Shadows & Highlights
  • Preview
    Improving Contrast in Panoramic Photos
  • Adjusting Vibrance in Panoramic Photos
  • Converting Panoramic Photos to Black and White
  • Outputting the Panoramic Photos
  • Should You Flatten a Panorama?
  • Cropping a Panoramic Photo to a Target Size & Resolution
  • Saving Panoramas for Printing
  • Saving Panoramas for the Web
  • Assembling Panoramas with Adobe Lightroom
  • Importing Photos into Lightroom
  • Initiating the Photo Merge Command
  • Choosing an Alignment Method in Lightroom
  • Using Boundary Warp
  • Developing the New RAW Panorama Image
  • Sending to Photoshop for Additional Processing
  • Conclusion

About this course

When one photo doesn't do justice to a scene, take several—and then stitch them together them into a panorama. In this course, Richard Harrington details every step in the panoramic photography process, from shooting to post-processing.



The course begins with a look at the concepts and technical details for getting great shots: how to choose a shooting format and size, how to properly mount the camera on a tripod, how to overlap each shot, which lenses deliver best results, and more. Plus, learn about optional hardware like the GigaPan system and sliders, and a variety of mobile apps for capturing 360-degree panoramas with an iPhone. After shooting a variety of panoramas, Richard processes them using various software tools, from Lightroom to Adobe Camera Raw and Photoshop. The course concludes with advice on refining stitched panoramas and on saving them for a variety of destinations, from print to the web.


Topics include:

  • Choosing your gear
  • Compensating for the nodal point
  • Stitching in camera
  • Leveling the camera platform
  • Locking exposure and focus
  • Shooting with the GigaPan system
  • Shooting HDR panoramas
  • Shooting with an iPhone
  • Managing data from a panorama shoot
  • Reducing noise and removing dust with Camera Raw
  • Initiating the Photomerge command
  • Blending the photos
  • Refining highlights and shadows
  • Saving panoramas for print and the web

Curriculum

  • Exercise Files
  • Welcome
  • What you Should Know Before Watching this Course
  • Using the Exercise Files
  • What is Panoramic Photography?
  • Preview
    The End Product
  • The Objectives to Achieve
  • Technical Essentials
  • Determining a Target Delivery Size
  • What is a Field of View?
  • Preview
    What is the Nodal Point?
  • Post-Processing Choices for Panoramic Photography
  • Equipment: What You'll Need, What You Might Want
  • A Solid Tripod for Panoramic Photography
  • Choosing a Tripod Head
  • Lens Choices for Panoramic Photography
  • Compensating for the Nodal Point
  • Choosing a Shooting Format
  • Shooting Panoramas as JPEG Files
  • Shooting Panoramas as RAW Files
  • Stitching in Camera
  • Shooting Strategies for Panoramic Photography
  • Leveling the Camera Platform
  • Cleaning the Lens
  • Locking Exposure & Focus
  • Preview
    Shooting with Overlap
  • Minimizing Camera Shake
  • A Refresher on Exposure Triangle
  • Shooting with the Gigapan System
  • What is GigaPan?
  • Building the GigaPan Platform
  • Framing & Recording the Shot with the GigaPan System
  • Shooting HDR Panoramas
  • Why Shoot an HDR Panorama?
  • Setting Up for the Shot
  • Shooting the Source Images
  • Alternative Shooting Styles for Panoramic Photography
  • Shooting a 360 Degree Panorama
  • Shooting Handheld
  • Shooting Panoramas using an iPhone
  • Using Photosynth for Panoramic Photography
  • Using Occipital 360 for Panoramic Photography
  • Managing Data from a Panoramic Photography Shoot
  • Using a Card Wallet
  • Transferring Data
  • Choosing a Working Drive
  • Organizing the Images for Post
  • Preview
    Using Stacks in Adobe Bridge
  • Renaming & Renumbering Image Sequences
  • Developing Panoramic Photographs with Adobe Camera Raw
  • Basic Exposure with Camera RAW
  • Advanced Recovery with Camera RAW
  • Reducing Noise with Camera RAW
  • Removing Dust with Camera RAW
  • Choosing a Bit Depth
  • Compensating for Lens Distortion
  • Assembling Panoramas with Adobe Photoshop
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Bridge
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Photoshop
  • Initiating the Photomerge Command from Lightroom
  • Choosing an Alignment Method
  • Compensating for Lens Distortion
  • Blending the Photos
  • Post-Merge Cleanup
  • Using the Adaptive Wide Angle Filter to Remove Distortion
  • Merging the 360-degree Panoramic Photo
  • Merging the HDR Panoramic Photo
  • Merging the GigaPan Panoramic Photo
  • Using Photoshop Filters & Adjustment Layers to Enhance Panoramas
  • Using Third-Party Filters to Enhance Panoramas
  • Additional Third-Party Filters to Enhance Panoramas
  • Finalizing Panoramas
  • Using the Photo Filter Adjustment Layer
  • Refining Shadows & Highlights
  • Preview
    Improving Contrast in Panoramic Photos
  • Adjusting Vibrance in Panoramic Photos
  • Converting Panoramic Photos to Black and White
  • Outputting the Panoramic Photos
  • Should You Flatten a Panorama?
  • Cropping a Panoramic Photo to a Target Size & Resolution
  • Saving Panoramas for Printing
  • Saving Panoramas for the Web
  • Assembling Panoramas with Adobe Lightroom
  • Importing Photos into Lightroom
  • Initiating the Photo Merge Command
  • Choosing an Alignment Method in Lightroom
  • Using Boundary Warp
  • Developing the New RAW Panorama Image
  • Sending to Photoshop for Additional Processing
  • Conclusion